MAD MONEY


Bustling and hustling

A rush so mad than madness

But all was involved

This madness amazed me

Yet they spat on the mad

And continued their madness

Their madness to them must be right

I wanted to know the cause

Cause of this madness

That made all so busy.

I stood, watched and observed carefully

Then I noticed the cause

The cause of the madness

It was a piece of paper

In various colours

It looked so tiny and useless

But considering the madness

That made all mad

I knew it was important

The piece of paper is necessary

An important thing for survival

That it made all mad and drunk

But thinking of the madness I witnessed

I knew everyone is mad.

 

 

Oyekan Oluwaseun Oyebimpe

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2 comments on “MAD MONEY

  1. Hmmmm…This is a good and wonderful work of art that explores the theme of materialism and I must not fail to commend the poet’s use of hyperbole, mainly in the 2nd line of the poem
    “mad than madness”.
    With this, the poet is able to exaggerate how people are crazy and mad about “paper”. To add to the madness, the poet makes it known that these set of mad people deny their madness, thereby calling other people “mad”, and condemning and blaming them for been “mad”, whereas, they themselves are rushing after this so called “paper”. “…they spat on the mad/ and continued their madness”.
    Another thing that I must not fail to commend is the poet’s objectiveness and the denial over-tone therein. The poet was able to refrain herself from concluding and saying what they were rushing after, rather, she regarded it as mere paper, thereby making a caricature of the beings rushing after this “paper”. Also, it is a satirical poem that sees money as mere “paper” and the poet’s description of this “paper” makes it look so tiny and not worth rushing after, thereby, making the readers to wonder what is causing the madness.
    As per the objectiveness, the poet did not judge. She only stated what she saw, the way she saw it and she leaves the readers to be the judge, just as Kambili in Chinamanda Ngozi Adachie’s PURPLE HIBISCUS. Finally, I must quickly add that this is a timely clarion call on all and sundry to stop the madness for this so called “paper”.
    —AUSTUS OFMAT NWANNE

    Like

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